Saturday, March 14, 2015

The Kosher Tax

Dennis Fetcho, aka "The Fetch," is the author of the Illuminatus Observer, a blog focusing on the Hermetic Qabalah. He is also the host of Inside the Eye - Live!, a news and current events streaming media radio talk show. Dennis is an American expat living in Amman, Jordan, working by day as a business strategist, specializing in telecommunications, aerospace, and defense. Dennis is here to speak about the secrets of the Kosher tax along with some of the other big anti-trust issues that are corroding Western values. Dennis begins with an explanation of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994, a deregulation law that allows the sale of supplements as food with no need for proof of effectiveness or safety, resulting in an explosion of sales. Then, he describes how Kosher food certifying organizations crept in and took advantage of the boom, creating a multi-billion dollar annual market. Dennis tells about how the entire supply chain of any product that carries the prestigious Kosher mark must be certified, right down to the utensils used in processing facilities. He clarifies the differences in non-Kosher vs. Kosher standards in food processing, and explains how these Laws of Kashrus are simply superstitious traditions passed down from the Bible. Further, Dennis illustrates the countless items of food that are already inherently Kosher, along with items that are impossible to substantiate and place into this category. We also take a look at where the profits are going, the preferential treatment given to Kosher certified products in stores, and the extortion-type fees that are paid to Rabbinic Field Representatives. In the second hour, we look at the reasons why consumers buy into the Kosher racket and consider the tricks of the trade in this Jewish monopoly. We chew over many other significant issues related to this elite game and how the hypocrisy involved has held Western values under siege for years. In conclusion, we deliberate tolerance and the need to decentralize the media.













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