Sunday, November 20, 2016

CERN - A Portal to Where?

What Are They Trying to Awaken at CERN and in Switzerland?
The Gotthard Base Tunnel began in 1947 with a curious sketch by Swiss engineer Carl Eduard Gruner (above).
During World War II, the Gruner Group (formerly Gruner Brothers) constructed railways, powers plants, and irrigation systems, but it was Gruner’s imagined shortcut through the base of the alps, connecting the Swiss towns of Erstfeld and Bodio by burrowing beneath the St. Gotthard Massif in the central Swiss Alps, that would prove to be the company’s greatest design. The Gotthard Base Tunnel (GBT) is the world’s deepest (1.42 miles) and longest tunnel (route length of 35.5 miles with a total of 94.3 miles when all shafts and passages are included). The tunnel consists of two parallel passages, each moving in a single direction on a single track.
The GBT passes directly beneath St. Gotthard’s Pass, a strategic north/south corridor that connects northern and southern Switzerland. Prior to the construction of the modern-day tunnels, including the Gotthard Rail Tunnel built in the 1880s, the only way to pass through this treacherous region was to cross the Devil’s Bridge (die Teufelsbrücke), which is aptly named considering the strange ceremony that accompanied the opening of the newest tunnel beneath the Massif. A legend regarding this Devil’s Bridge (according to oral histories cited at Wikipedia[i]) says this:
The legend itself is related by Johann Jakob Scheuchzer (1716). According to Scheuchzer, he was told a local legend according to which the people of Uri recruited the Devil for the difficult task of building the bridge. The Devil requested to receive the first thing to pass the bridge in exchange for his help. To trick the Devil, who expected to receive the soul of the first man to pass the bridge, the people of Uri sent across a dog by throwing a piece of bread, and the dog was promptly torn to pieces by the Devil. Enraged at having been tricked the Devil went to fetch a large rock to smash the bridge, but, carrying the rock back to the bridge, he came across a holy man who “scolded him” (der ihn bescholten) and forced him to drop the rock, which could still be seen on the path below Göschenen. A modern retelling was published by Meinrad Lienert, Schweizer Sagen und Heldengeschichten (1915). According to Lienert’s version, a goat was sent across the bridge instead of a dog, and instead of the holy man, the Devil, when he was taking a break exhausted from carrying the rock, came across an old woman who marked the rock with a cross, forcing the Devil to abandon it and flee.[ii]
Erstfeld lies a twisty 186 miles or so from Geneva (CERN), and Bodio (the southern portal for the new tunnel) just as far (or farther, if one chooses to go through Erstfeld first—a laborious journey, but one that Google maps apparently suggests). The connection to Geneva’s Large Hadron Collider must be made, primarily because of the bizarre opening ceremony that was live-streamed to the entire world on June 1, 2016. So, let’s unpack the imagery within that occult dance, beginning with a call to unite the religions of the world by conducting an “interfaith” blessing of the tunnel beside a statue of St. Barbara (the patron saint of miners). St. Barbara is another curious component in this bizarre ceremony. Traditionally, her veneration and worship is said to have begun in Bohemia. According to C. E. Gregory:
Barbara Cathedral in Kuttenberg (Bohemia) built between 1388 and 1518 in the old silver city. This was thought to be the most likely source of the Barbara adoration. The cathedral was built around an already existing Barbara altar in an area with many Barbara altars present. Kuttenberg has for centuries had on its coat of arms St. Barbara above the crossed hammer and gad [Schlaegel und Eisen—the classical symbol of mining].[iii]
Allegedly, Barbara lived during the third century AD in Asia Minor in Nicromedia (near Baalbeck). Though her father planned to marry her off to a wealthy and influential friend who served “the old gods” of paganism (if they lived near Baalbeck, one can surmise which entities her father was actually serving), but Barbara chose Christianity instead—dying a martyr’s death for her trouble when she was tortured by the Roman pro-consul and then beheaded by her father. According to Wikipedia, Barbara is also considered one of the “Fourteen Holy Helpers,” a group of super saints whose core members are three virgin martyrs: St. Catherine, St. Margaret, and, of course, St. Barbara. Barbara is associated with a tower, because her father shut her up in one to keep her from the world whilst he arranged her marriage to his pagan buddy. Catherine is linked with “the wheel,” a torture device known as “the breaking wheel,” which (when Catherine was placed upon it) shattered, leaving the torturer, Maxentius, no choice but to behead her. And Margaret is associated with “the Dragon,” because Satan in the form of a dragon had tried to eat her, but her cross irritated his tummy, so he disgorged her and Margaret was put to death.
Three virgins who serve as super saints, and a tower, a wheel, and the dragon. It sounds like a hand from a tarot deck! It is also a dark echo of the three faces of the pagan moon goddess: the virgin/maiden (in white), the harlot/mother (in red and often pregnant), and the crone/widow (an old woman dressed in black).
Connected to this idea of a “triple goddess” is a legend called “The Three Bethan,” a triune goddess worshiped throughout Bavaria that is eerily similar to this notion of three virgin super saints. According to an article at druidry.org, these three supposedly Christian virgins gave all their money to build a chapel, but are actually pagan in origin:
“Beten” in modern German means “to pray.” Probably the act of worshipping the Bethen was so important and widespread that their name left its mark on the word for praying to them. Firpet or Firbet, the name of the third woman on the Leutstetten image, in modern German sounds pretty much like “Fürbitte” (intercession).
The Bethen were venerated especially in the presence of trees, wells and stones. This finds its expression in the terms “Bethelbäume” (Bethen trees), “Bethenbrunnen” (Bethen wells) and “Bethensteine” (Bethen stones). As we know, worship at wells, in forest groves and near unusual stones was a widespread feature in Celtic and Germanic religion, so we can safely assume that the Bethen cult has pre-Christian roots.[iv]
Now, why would we even care about pagan triple goddesses, if our topic for this entry is about a tunnel beneath an Alpine pass? It is because of the unusual ceremony that inaugurated this dual tunnel system, and the interfaith call to worship that occurred in front of St. Barbara (whose “triple goddess” identity is made clearer in the ceremony itself). Three women—three aspects of the same moon/fertility goddess.
The “Triple Goddess” is not restricted to Alpine mythology:
Greek: Hebe/Hera/Hecate (also Artemis/Selene/Hecate); Aphrodite Urania/Aphrodite Pontia/Aphrodite Pandemos
Roman: Luna/Diana/Proserpina; Phoebe/Diana/Hecate; Juventas/Juno/Minerva
Egyptian: Hathor/Bast/Sekhmet; Hathor/Nephthys/Isis
Hindu: Parvati/Lakshmi/Saraswati
Irish: Badb/macha/Morrígu
Mesopotamian: Inanna/Ishtar/Astarte; Asherah/Astarte/Anat
Arabian (pre-Islamic): Al-Lat/Al-Uzza/Manat
Norse: Freyja/Frigg/ Skaði[v]
hecateHecate, mentioned above, was the Titan earth-mother of the wizards and witches, and illustrates the triple connection between the sky, earth, and underworld realm of evil supernaturalism. As the daughter of Perses and Asteria, Hecate (Hekate) was the only Titan to remain free under Zeus. She was the mother of the wizard Circe and of the witch Medea. She was characterized by the unknown and by the night-terrors that roamed the abandoned and desolate highways.
Other revealing facts about Hecate include:
  • Hecate was often depicted as a young maiden with three faces, each pointing in a different direction—a role in which she was the earth-spirit that haunted wherever three paths joined. As the “goddess of three forms,” she was Luna (the moon) in heaven, Diana (Artemis) on earth, and Hecate of the underworld.
  • At midnight, Hecate’s devotees would leave food offerings at intersections for the goddess (Hecate’s Supper) and, once deposited, quickly exit without turning around or looking back. Sometimes the offerings consisted of honey cakes and chicken hearts, while at other times, puppies and female black lambs were slaughtered and mixed with honey for the goddess and her strigae. (Strigae were deformed, owl-like affiliates of Hecate that I wrote about in The Gods Who Walk Among Us and that Warner Brothers featured from that book in one season of the long-running TV program Supernatural (and consequently invited me to travel to their studios in California to be part of a bonus disc with other “religious” experts on the release of that season to DVD, which I declined) who flew through the night feeding on the bodies of unattended babies. During the day, they appeared as simple old women—folklore that may account for the history of flying witches. The strigae hid amidst the leaves of the trees during the annual festival of Hecate, held on August 13, when Hecate’s followers offered up the highest praise of the goddess).
  • Hecate’s devotees celebrated with festivals near Lake Averna in Campania, where the sacred willow groves of the goddess stood, and they communed with the tree spirits (earth spirits, including Hecate, were thought to inhabit trees) and summoned the souls of the dead from the mouths of nearby caves. It was here that Hecate was known as Hecate-Chthonia, (Hecate of the earth), a depiction in which she most clearly embodied the popular earth-mother-spirit that conversed through the cave stones and sacred willow trees.
Yet Hecate had other, more revealing titles, and these names are the subject of interest for the time being: 1) Hecate-Phosphoros (“The Light Bearer” [recalling another powerful underworld spirit whose original name was Lucifer, “the light bearer”]); and 2) Hecate-Propylaia (“The One Who Guards the Gate”).
The idea that mythological deities were perceived as guarding gates (and in some cases imprisoned behind them), and that often these gods and goddesses were known by ancients as “light bearers” is interesting in view of Scripture. The Hebrew translation of the word “Lucifer” means “light bearer,” and the New Testament speaks of Satan being “transformed into an angel of light” (2 Corinthians 11:14). A deeper study of Scripture supports the idea that spiritual forces that exist behind barriers or “gates” are located in the sky, sea, and physical earth. For instance, the book of Ephesus is a study of principalities and powers in “high places” and “powers of the air.” In Nehemiah 9:6, the prophet speaks of more than one heaven: He saw the heavens and the “heaven of heavens.” These are peripheral heavens, or divisions, as Paul refers to in 2 Corinthians 12:2, saying, “I knew a man in Christ above fourteen years ago…[who was] caught up to the third heaven.” As a Pharisee, Paul acknowledged three main “heavens,” which include a domain of air (the kosmos), or height, controlled by Satan. In pharisaical thought, the first heaven is simply the place where the birds fly, anything removed from and not attached to the surface of the earth. On the other end of the spectrum and of a different substance is the third heaven—the dwelling place of God. This is the place from which angelic spheres spread outward. Between the first heaven where the birds fly and the third heaven “where dwells the throne room of God” is a war zone called the second heaven. This is a place of brass gates (see the Apocalypse of Zephaniah)—the kosmos or Hebrew equivalent of the Persian Ahriman-abad (as in my novel The Ahriman Gate)—the place where Satan or Beelzebul (the “lord of the height”) abides as the prince of the power of the “air” (aer, the lower air, circumambient). This war zone is a sort of gasket heaven, the domain of Satan encompassing the surface of the earth. It was believed that from here kosmokrators could overshadow cities, intrude upon, and attempt to influence the affairs and governments of men. It was also believed that from the kosmos Satan’s minions also sought to close the gateways above cities so that God’s blessings could not flow into them. Later, it was believed that when saints bent their knees in prayer, they had to pray through walls/gates of opposition contained within this gasket heaven.
In addition to heavenly gateways behind which fallen spirits dwell, Job 2.6 tells of Jonah going down to the bottom of the sea into a “city of gates” (Bariyach, a fortress in the earth, a prison) from which God delivered him. There is no doubt about where Jonah was as he prayed to God in Jonah 2:2 “out of the belly of hell” (Sheol—the underworld prison of the dead). This text is both fascinating and illuminating when compared to the words of Christ in Matthew 16:17–18: “Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona [son of Jonah]…thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” Matthew’s unusual choice of words connecting the rock upon which the church would be built, the name of Jonah, and the gates of hell is not a coincidence. Christ made the same connection to hell’s gateway, Jonah, and his mission for the church in Matthew 12.40: “For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.”
Source: http://skywatchtv.com/2016/11/20/part-4-abaddon-ascending-articles-series/

No comments: